How to write the perfect sponsorship pitch letter

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Bloggers, how you write a pitch can either get you a gig or be written off. Recently, my friend Whitney asked me to help her with her pitch letter. Below I am sharing with you what I shared with her. And the best part? It worked!

I am glad that I asked Annie to help me write a pitch to a company for a blog conference sponsorship. Not only did I get a full sponsorship but I also got a job working for a company I love. Annie extended her help, knowledge and gave me the tools I needed to successfully gain a blog conference sponsorship.

~Whitney from Rambles of a stay at home mom

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Now here is my letter to her – let me know if you have any questions! I hope it works for you too!

What worked for me:
I kept my emails short, sweet and to the point.  When I emailed companies for sponsorship it was usually either because — 1.) We had already worked together before  or 2) They company was a super good fit for my blog and I really wanted to work with them more.  Any other company usually didn’t agree to sponsor me.  So when I emailed them, I kept it very short and very confident.
I imagine companies/reps get lots of emails every day, so I wanted mine to stand out as one that didn’t waste their time and really stated exactly why investing in me was a good marketing move for them.
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My pitches usually went like this: 
If I worked with them before —
Hi Ashley!
I loved that dog chow campaign we worked on last month.  My readers really “ate it up!” I’m headed to a dog lovers conference in a few months and really want to promote your dog chow to these pet bloggers.  Let me know if you would like to discuss a sponsorship package to fit your budget! Sponsorship can be as large as full conference sponsorship (heavy promotion to the attendees as well as on my blog to those not going) and as small as only conference or only online promotion. Whatever the case, I really want to promote your dog chow, so I can’t wait to hear from you!
Annie
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If I did not work with them before —
Hi Ashley!
My name is Annie Shultz, owner of MamaDweeb.com.  My readers are passionate pet owners and I am very impressed with your organic dog chow and would love to discuss a way we can work together to promote to my audience.  I am also headed to this dog-lovers niche conference in October and can’t think of a better brand to sponsor my blog than your chow. I can’t wait to hear from you and find a sponsorship package online and/or offline that works for your budget.
Please let me know what questions you have,
thank you so much!
Annie
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Soooo—– basically, you just say how amazing their brand is, how they are the perfect fit for your audience and why.  Then you leave the rest open.  Don’t list all the ways they can work with you in the first email.  Either they will read it and go “yeah, can’t afford any of this” or something like it. Leave it open so they can email you back and ask more questions. And unless your stats are like astronomical (more than 50k uniques a month) you don’t have to mention stats. Now if you do get more than 50K uniques, you can totally put that in there. “Blog Name receives more than 50,000 unique visitors each month and I’d love to promote your dog chow to my readers.” But like I said – stats are not the only thing. Show how their brand matches your readers. That is even more important.
That is it!Keep in mind that this method works with any type of blog pitch.  Just replace the blog conference mention with the item you hope to review or the giveaway event you hope they join.  As long as you say in a few words (not a book) how your blog is perfect for their brand, you are more likely to find success.
Any questions?

Written by:: Annie Shultz

Annie Shultz has written 1948 post in this blog.

She is THE Mama Dweeb :) She created this blog back in 2009 and loves to inspire and connect with others through her writing. She also loves talking, dreaming, 90s pop and country music.

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Comments

  1. says

    Great tips, Annie! I would add the suggestion of giving the the value up front by telling the brand why working with you (or sponsoring) would be beneficial for them.

    • Annie @ Mama Dweeb says

      Good point Amanda! I would definitely keep that value statement to 3 sentences max though. I’ve read some very lengthy and wordy pitches and if you make them too long, they are more likely to get deleted and passed over. But if you give that value in a few short – and powerful – sentences, you will have them emailing you asking for more information.

  2. Stephanie Dake Thompson says

    I have been wondering how to do this for months now and in fact I think it is the last question I had before I will start my own blog. I know it is so important to write it right to get the sponsership and I am hoping to get sponsers that sell the things that I already use and think A lot of. Thank you so much for sharing.

  3. says

    How helpful! I’m bookmarking this stat & hoping to give it a try sometime soon. I always wondered how bloggers gained sponsorships to conferences. Thanks for your help!

    • Annie @ Mama Dweeb says

      Thank you so much Jelli! Yes, most bloggers obtain sponsorship to conferences from companies they have worked with previously. Bloggers also pitch companies/brands that are directly reflective of their audience (like a mom of newborn pitching a diaper company). And the work they do to earn the money is some form of blog posts, side bar ads, and social media promotion, but I have also heard of bloggers agreeing to do video and/or creating content for a brand’s own site/blog/newsletter.

    • Annie @ Mama Dweeb says

      Yup! I don’t do it as much anymore since I usually just work with people that I have worked with before and/or I get introduced to reps/brands through friends. Networking is such a powerful thing in blogging (as with other careers). Let me know if you have more questions :)

    • Annie @ Mama Dweeb says

      This sounds like a great question for another blog post :) I mean it, cause that is exactly where I started.

      Smaller audience can mean a few different things: 1) newer blog, that is growing or 2) Blog in a specific niche, dedicated (but smaller) audience 3) Still learning and achieving potential

      If you are experience growth but still consider yourself “small,” just go for it and pitch brands! Tell them about your loyal readers and your engagement. And if you are #2 – niche focused – that is AWESOME! Tell the brands about how their product is perfect because your readers are already passionate about it since you blog specifically about that topic.
      And if you have a small audience and feel frustrated because you are not seeing growth, I know some fabulous resources I can point you to. Just ask :)

      I’ll be honest – the blogosphere is growing very full and very fast. It is even more competitive now than when I started 3 years ago. But don’t feel discouraged. It just takes work. So when you work with a brand – no matter how “small” you feel the campaign is – track it and make a case study of it. (I need to write a post about how to do this too) Then, you can use your experience working with this brand to share in your pitch.

      Let me know if you have more questions. This will definitely be explained even further in a post this week.

  4. says

    When you say “I can’t wait to hear from you and find a sponsorship package online and/or offline that works for your budget.”, what exactly does ‘online and/or offline’ mean? Online – Over email; Offline – in person?

    • says

      Online and/or offline means different ways of promoting their company.

      Online – I write sponsored content, share social media content from their channels to my audience, etc.

      Offline – Hosting parties in my home where I promote their products. (Here is one I did in my home for Barbie http://mamadweeb.com/2012/09/barbie-party-the-princess-and-the-popstar-giveaway/)
      Another offline idea – wearing branded shirts/hats/etc to conferences, planning and organizing a blogger meet-up sponsored by the brand….

      Basically online is online and offline is in person, as you correctly wrote :)

    • says

      Thank you Michelle! I really do think people overthink pitch letters. What matters most is “how does this brand relate to my audience?” Sure every blogger rocks it on social media, we can (mostly) all write freaking awesome posts – but what is it about YOUR blog and your audience that makes this brand a perfect fit?

      Thank you again for pinning and sharing!

  5. says

    I have a really stupid question– what person in the company are you pitching? Are you looking for their head of marketing, advertising types, or one of the execs? I don’t want to waste someone’s time. Thanks!

    • says

      Patricia, that is NOT a stupid question. In fact, the answer isn’t straightforward, and I hope it helps you :)
      Cold-pitching is one of the hardest forms. I mean, completely COLD pitching. When it comes to blogging, it is ALL about relationships and networking – with other bloggers and with heads of companies and PR/advertising reps. So if you have a circle of close blogging friends, you can begin being introduced to the people THEY work with. Here is a post about some communities I have found, there are TONS out there http://mamadweeb.com/2011/04/mom-blog-communities-necessary-for-blog-growth/

      But if you are cold pitching without an introduction from a friend, you will have to do research. Typically (there are always exceptions though) Public Relations firms have less of a budget than advertising firms. PR’s goal is more about working the image and “good words” about a brand. They often have access to free samples of products but not much money. Again, there are exceptions! But you can always Google “BRAND NAME Press Release” or if you saw a review on a blog for an item you want to review, search “BRAND NAME ITEM NAME PRESS RELEASE CONTACT” and you will (often) be able to find the Press Release with contact info. Finding the advertising rep has proved harder for me. Often I have to just make an initial contact with someone, build a trust with them and then ask that if they don’t have a budget if they can share the contact info of the advertising person who might. :)

      If it is a small business, often emailing their main email found on their website will get your email sent to the correct person. In that case, send a brief, “please direct me to the right person” email, explaining very briefly what you desire and why that is a fabulous investment for them to make. And another tip: you will have much more luck cold pitching companies that have worked with bloggers before :) (Google “Item Name blog review” to see if they have)

      This answer is pretty lengthy, let me know if I did not answer your question! :)

    • says

      Thank you Shecki! Good luck as you venture into the world of blogging! Let me know if you ever have any questions, I am always here! (I’m always a tweet away LOL @MamaDweeb)

  6. says

    Very concise and that’s how I think pitch letters should be. Thanks for sharing these tips and the samples you have provided. Now, I can tweak my own pitch letter. :)

  7. says

    Thank you so much for this post. I was having a hard time on where to start with this and didn’t want to go over board. This is a great resource and I both pinned and bookmarked this for reference. Thanks again!

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